Theophany II

Jegudil.jpg
  1. Jegudiel

    Jegudiel is the patron of all who work in some field of endeavor, and the crown he holds symbolizes the reward for successful spiritual labors. Along with his subordinate angels, he is the advisor and defender of all who work in positions of responsibility to the glory of God, and as such is resorted to by kings, judges, and others in positions of leadership. Jegudiel is also known as the bearer of God's merciful love and also angel over Friday. Considered as one of the seven archangels in a variant Catholic system, which pairs each archangel with a specific day of the week and attribute. With regard to the history of the archangel's name, it is thought to have first been mentioned in the non canonical Book of Enoch between 130 BCE and 68 CE.

Pinturicchio_-_The_Annunciation_(detail)_-_WGA17770.jpg

2. Gabriel

Gabriel (/ˈɡeɪbriəl/; Hebrew: גַּבְרִיאֵל‎, lit. 'Gavri'el "God is my strength"', Ancient Greek: Γαβριήλ, lit. 'Gabriel', Coptic: Ⲅⲁⲃⲣⲓⲏⲗ, Aramaic: ܓܒܪܝܝܠ‎, Arabic: جبريل, Jibrīl or جبرائيل Jibrāʾīl), in the Abrahamic religions, is an archangel. He was first described in the Hebrew Bible and was subsequently adopted by other traditions.

In the Hebrew Bible, Gabriel appears to the prophet Daniel, to explain his visions (Daniel 8:15–26, 9:21–27). Gabriel the archangel is also a character in other ancient Jewish writings such as the Book of Enoch. Alongside archangel Michael, Gabriel is described as the guardian angel of Israel, defending this people against the angels of the other nations.

Jewish rabbis interpreted the "man in linen" as Gabriel in the Book of Daniel and the Book of Ezekiel. In the Book of Daniel, Gabriel is responsible for interpreting Daniel's visions. Gabriel's main function in Daniel is that of revealer, a role he continues in later literature. In the Book of Ezekiel, Gabriel is understood to be the angel that was sent to destroy Jerusalem. According to the Jewish Encyclopedia, Gabriel takes the form of a man, and stands at the left hand of God. Shimon ben Lakish (Syria Palaestina, 3rd century) concluded that the angelic names of Michael, Raphael, and Gabriel came out of the Babylonian exile (Gen. Rab. 48:9). Alongside archangel Michael, Gabriel is described as the guardian angel of Israel, defending this people against the angels of the other nations.

3. Selaphiel

Selaphiel appears in verse 31:6 of the apocryphal Jewish and Christian text The Conflict of Adam and Eve, which describes how God sends him and Suriyel to help rescue Adam and Eve from Satan’s deception, commanding Selaphiel “to bring them down from the top of the high mountain and to take them to the Cave of Treasures.”

Some Christian traditions consider Selaphiel as the angel in Revelation 8:3-4 in the New Testament, who presents the prayers of people on Earth to God in heaven: "Another angel, who had a golden censer, came and stood at the altar. He was given much incense to offer, with the prayers of all God’s people, on the golden altar in front of the throne. The smoke of the incense, together with the prayers of God’s people, went up before God from the angel’s hand."

El_Arcángel_Seatiel_con_incensario,_de_Bartolomé_Román_(Museo_del_Prado).jpg
St_Uriel,_St_John's_Church,_Warminster,_Wiltshire.jpg

4. Uriel

Uriel (/ˈjʊəriəl/; Hebrew: אוּרִיאֵל "El/God is my light", Standard Hebrew Uriʾel, Tiberian Hebrew Ûrîʾēl; Greek: Ουριήλ; Coptic: ⲟⲩⲣⲓⲏⲗ; Italian: Uriele; Geʽez and Amharic: ዑራኤል ʿUraʾēl or ዑርኤል ʿUriʾēl) is one of the archangels of post-exilic rabbinic tradition, and also of certain Christian traditions.

Uriel appears in the Second Book of Esdras found in the Biblical apocrypha (called Esdras IV in the Vulgate) in which the prophet Ezra asks God a series of questions and Uriel is sent by God to instruct him. According to the Revelation of Esdras, the angels that will rule at the end of the world are Michael, Gabriel, Uriel, Raphael, Gabuthelon, Beburos, Zebuleon, Aker, and Arphugitonos. The last five listed only appear in this book and nowhere else in apocryphal or apocalyptic works.

In Christian apocryphal gospels Uriel plays a role, differing between the sources, in the rescue of Jesus' cousin John the Baptist from the Massacre of the Innocents ordered by King Herod. He carries John and his mother Saint Elizabeth to join the Holy Family after their Flight into Egypt. Their reunion is depicted in Leonardo da Vinci's Virgin of the Rocks.

5. Raphael

Raphael (/ˈræfiəl/; Hebrew: רָפָאֵל, translit. Rāfāʾēl, lit. 'It is God who heals', 'God Heals', 'God, Please Heal'; Ancient Greek: Ραφαήλ, Coptic: ⲣⲁⲫⲁⲏⲗ, Arabic: رفائيل‎ or إسرافيل) is an archangel responsible for healing in the traditions of most Abrahamic religions. Not all branches of these religions consider the identification of Raphael to be canonical.

In Christianity, Raphael is generally associated with an unnamed angel mentioned in the Gospel of John, who stirs the water at the healing pool of Bethesda. Raphael is recognized as an angel in Mormonism, as he is briefly mentioned in the Doctrine and Covenants. Raphael is mentioned in the Book of Tobit, which is accepted as canonical by Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and some Anglicans.

In Islam, Raphael is the fourth major angel; and in the Muslim tradition, he is known as Isrāfīl. Though unnamed in the Quran, hadith identifies Israfil with the angel of Quran 6:73. Within Islamic eschatology, Israfil is traditionally attributed to a trumpet, which is poised at his lips, and when God so commands he shall be ready to announce the Day of Resurrection.

Saint_Raphael.JPG
El_Arcángel_Baraquiel_esparciendo_flores,_de_Bartolomé_Román_(Museo_del_Prado).jpg

6. Barachiel

Barachiel (Heb. ברכיאל "Bārkiʼēl", blessed by God; Arabic: بُراقيل "Burāqīl") is one of the seven Archangels in Byzantine Catholic and Eastern Orthodox tradition.

In the Third Book of Enoch, he is described as one of the angelic princes, with a myriad of some 496,000 ministering angels attending him. He is described in the Almadel of Solomon as one of the chief angels of the first and fourth chora. He is often confused with the angel Baraqiel who is regarded as the angel of lightning.

The Third Book of Enoch describes archangel Barachiel as one of the angels who serve as great and honored angelic princes in heaven, and mentions that Barachiel leads 496,000 other angels. He is considered one of the seraphim class of angels who guard God's throne, as well as the leader of all the guardian angels.

7. Michael

Michael (Hebrew pronunciation: [mixaˈʔel]; Hebrew: מִיכָאֵל‎, romanizedMîkhā'ēl, lit. 'Who is like God?'; Greek: Μιχαήλ, romanizedMikhaḗl; Latin: Michahel; Coptic: ⲙⲓⲭⲁⲏⲗ; Arabic: ميخائيل ، مِيكَالَ ، ميكائيل‎, romanizedMīkā'īl, Mīkāl or Mīkhā'īl, lit. 'Man Ka El? = من كإيل/كإله/كالله؟') is an archangel in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran systems of faith, he is called "Saint Michael the Archangel" and "Saint Michael". In the Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Orthodox religions, he is called "Saint Michael the Taxiarch".

Michael is mentioned three times in the Book of Daniel. The idea that Michael was the advocate of the Jews became so prevalent that, in spite of the rabbinical prohibition against appealing to angels as intermediaries between God and his people, Michael came to occupy a certain place in the Jewish liturgy.

In the New Testament Michael leads God's armies against Satan's forces in the Book of Revelation, where during the war in heaven he defeats Satan. In the Epistle of Jude Michael is specifically referred to as "the archangel Michael". Catholic sanctuaries to Michael appeared in the 4th century, when he was first seen as a healing angel, and then over time as a protector and the leader of the army of God against the forces of evil.

Luca_Giordano_-_The_Fall_of_the_Rebel_Angels_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg
Evelyn_De_Morgan_-_Angel_of_Death.jpg

8. Sariel

According to the Book of Enoch, Sariel, was one of the leaders of angels who lusted after the daughters of men. They descended to the summit of Mount Hermon, in the days of Jared, to acquire wives and lead men astray. Sariel specifically taught men about the course of the moon. Knibbs' translation of the names of the Book of Enoch says it was Sariel who taught humans the "course of the moon" (the Lunar Calendar). His name is also listed as Arazyal and Asaradel in some 1 Enoch translations, the name being a combination of sa'ar and 'God.' In this same book, Saraqael (communicants of God) is one of the holy angels, who watch over the spirits that sin in the spirit, and Suryal is one of the angels who look upon the bloodshed on Earth, along with Gabriel, Michael, Raphael and Uriel.

9. Zadkiel

Zadkiel (Hebrew: צָדְקִיאֵלTsadqiel, "Righteousness of God" or Hesediel Hebrew: חֶסֶדִיאֵלChesediel, Coptic: ⲥⲉⲇⲁⲕⲓⲏⲗ Sedakiel "Grace of God") is the archangel of freedom, benevolence and mercy, and the Patron Angel of all who forgive, also known as Sachiel, Zedekiel, Zadakiel, Tzadkiel, and Zedekul. Rabbinical tradition considers him to be the angel of mercy.

In rabbinic writings Zadkiel belongs to the order of Hashmallim (equated with the Dominations or Dominions), and considered by some sources to be chief of that order (others sources name Hashmal or Zacharael). In Maseket Azilut Zadkiel/Hesediel is listed as co-chief with Gabriel of the order of Shinanim. As an angel of mercy, some texts claim that Zadkiel is the unnamed biblical Angel of the Lord who holds back Abraham to prevent the patriarch from sacrificing his son, and because of this is usually shown holding a dagger. Other texts cite Michael or Tadhiel or some other angel as the angel intended, while others interpret the Angel of the Lord as a theophany.

Zadkiel is one of two standard bearers (along with Jophiel) who follow directly behind Michael as the head archangel enters battle. Zadkiel is associated with the color violet. In iconography, he is often depicted holding a knife or dagger.

Abraham.jpg
image-asset.jpg

10. Ananiel

Ananiel, Anânêl (Aramaic: עננאל, Greek: Ανανθνά) was the 14th Watcher of the 20 leaders of the 200 fallen angels who are mentioned in an ancient work titled the Book of Enoch. The name Ananiel is sometimes translated as "Rain of God" even though the name is often confused with the name Hananiel. Michael Knibb interprets his name to be "cloud of god".

Conversely, according to the tradition of the Coptic Orthodox Church, Ananiel is the name of one of the seven holy archangels.